Tule Lake National Monument

The Tule Lake National Monument includes both the Tule Lake Segregation Center, the largest and most controversial sites where Japanese Americans were incarcerated during World War II, and Camp Tulelake, which was first a Civilian Conservation Corps camp, then an additional facility to detain Japanese Americans, and finally a prisoner of war camp.

Visitor Center and Museum

Begin your visit at the Visitor Center located at the Tulelake Fairgrounds Museum.

Here you will find ½ a barrack, showing how family and bachelor quarters might have been set up during WWII. The barrack also shows how homesteaders after WWII converted the barracks into homes. You’ll also find the top guard tower, a mural of the camp, and other exhibits.

The Visitor Center is staffed by Rangers seven days a week from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day. Visitor Center hours are 8:30 am to 5:00 pm. In the off season, the Visitor Center is still open to view, only not staffed by Rangers.

Tule Lake Segregation Center

The Tule Lake Segregation Center was the only one of the ten War Relocation Centers to be converted into a maximum security segregation center with a stockade and jail. Today, you can view the area from outside a fence, or you may arrange a Ranger Guided Tour if you wish to look inside.

Camp Tulelake

Camp Tulelake was first built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1935, but later housed Japanese Americans in 1943. Later is housed German Prisoners of War from 1944-1946. Visitors may only enter the grounds as part of a Ranger Guided Tour.

Ranger Guided Tours

Ranger Guided Tours can be arranged to view Camp Tulelake or the Tule Lake Segregation Unit. Tours are limited to 20 people. Please attempt to make tour arrangement at least 2 weeks in advance. Due to staffing, Rangers may not be able to accommodate all requests. Reserve your spot by calling 530-260-0537.

So you want to visit Klamath County?

This guide will show you why Klamath is the perfect spot for your vacation!